Missouri Bicycling, Walking, Running, and Trails News

Fall flurry of accidents in KC . . .

There has been a flurry of bicycle-related deaths in the KC area. Causes: Too fast, inobservant driving? Cyclist's disregard of traffic laws? Joining MBF is one way you can do something to help make motorists more aware of bicyclists and make bicycling in Missouri safer.
Read more

KC regional TEA21 bike/ped projects under review

KC Area CMAQ Projects Under Review Late October 2002 - citizen comments could make a difference in setting bicycle policy throughout the KC area.
Read more

Important MBF Meeting Sunday, Nov. 3rd, 2002

Greetings Bike Advocates!



It is time for bicyclists to unite!!!




Please join us on Sunday, November 3, 2002, and encourage all other bicycle

enthusiasts to also join us (bike shop personnel, racers, bike club

members, bike facility planners, mountain bike riders, legislators, etc.)




Where: Viewpoint Conference Room (by cafeteria) at Capital Region Medical

Center, Southwest Boulevard, Jefferson City, MO.




Directions: From Jefferson City, take Hwy 54 west (towards Eldon) to the

Ellis/Southwest Blvd exit. Go north (right) on Southwest Blvd for ten

blocks. Turn left into the hospital parking lot and keep going the same

direction to the last lot. Go in the double doors by the circle drive.




Fun first!!!



10 am - Bicycle ride sponsored by Caryn Giarratano. Meet in the hospital

parking lot to ride the 20-mile loop called the JC Loop. Drawn to scale

route maps will be available. Lunch will be on your own, but carpooling to

restaurants will be available.




Business later...



Missouri Bicycle Federation Annual Meeting Agenda



Sunday, November 3, 2002, 1-4 pm





  • Introductions and Welcome - Caryn Giarratano
  • Request for a substitute secretary due to the absence of Art Gough
  • Correspondence report -Caryn Giarratano
  • Approval of the last year's annual minutes as printed
  • Treasurer's Report - Caryn Giarratano
  • Old Business - Caryn Giarratano



  • New Business:




    Mike Brady Bill - Elaine Brady



    Elaine's husband, Mike Brady, was killed in 2000 while racing in Bicycle

    Across Missouri (BAM) by a motorist who ran off the road and hit Mike from

    behind. Elaine is seeking assistance in changing our current law to allow a

    person's past driving history to be entered as evidence during any current

    violation proceedings.




    Share the Road - Larry Welty



    Larry is a licensed professional engineer who has been employed by MoDOT

    for 18 years as a construction inspector, a highway designer and a planner.

    An avid bicyclist, he has pushed for consideration of pedestrians and

    bicyclists in MoDOT projects and operations. He is an original member of

    East-West Gateway Coordinating Council's Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory

    Committee and served as MoDOT's Interim Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator

    from August 2001 to June 2002. As part of his current responsibilities, he

    reviews federally funded, local bicycle projects in District 6.




    Storm Grates and Rumble Strips - Caryn Giarratano



    Caryn is an avid cyclist and bicycle advocate. She was a co-founder of the

    Missouri Bicycle Federation in 1993, was its first Chair and helped to lead

    the push to repeal the state mandatory sidepath law in 1995. She was hired

    by MoDOT on July 1 as the State Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator.




    Bicycle Facilities - Paul Wojciechowski




    TEA-3 - Hope Visconti



    Hope is a professional urban planner who is new to the world of bicycling

    advocacy. Her current position as an intermediate transportation planner

    with MoDOT allows her ongoing contact with several policy makers in the

    Kansas City, Missouri Region. She currently serves on the Mid-America

    Regional Council's Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee and several

    steering committees for individual on-street and off-street bicycle

    projects. Her current responsibilities include reviewing plans and

    programs for several federally funded local projects; including, aesthetic

    enhancements, historic restoration, air quality improvement and bicycle and

    pedestrian projects.




    America Bikes - Bob Foster



    Bob has been commuting to work by bike for nine years. He is an avid long

    distance cyclist-including a 26-hour crossing of Missouri in the 1999 BAM

    and a 23-hour triple century in 2000. He is the founder and current Chair

    of the St. Louis Regional Bicycle Federation.




    Bicycle Level of Service and National Bike Routes across MO




    Election of Officers to assume duties on January 1, 2003: Chair,

    Vice-Chair, Secretary, Treasurer with the appointment by the new board of

    three more who usually serve as Legislative Liason, MoDOT Liason and

    Editor. Caryn is not allowed to assume a leadership role with MBF due to a

    conflict with her new job.




    Area Reports from attendees





Contact Information: Missouri Bicycle Federation, Inc., POB 104871,

Jefferson City, MO 65110-4871




Background: MBF is a statewide, not-for-profit, membership organization

that advocates advancement of bicycling access, safety and education in

Missouri. It was founded by Caryn Giarratano (the first Chair) and Mike

Hoeferkamp (the first Treasurer) in 1993, and incorporated in the state of

Missouri on

November 17, 1994. The annual business meeting and election of officers is

the first Sunday in November.




Mission: The mission of the Missouri Bicycle Federation is to provide an

advocacy platform to protect the rights and interests of bicyclists and to

make Missouri a better place to ride a bicycle through the advancement of

bicycle access, safety and education.




Goals: Obtain funding to meet goals; Coordinate efforts among constituents;

Communicate with other state groups; Educate the public on benefits of our

sport in the areas of health, social and environment; Lobby for legislative

issues on behalf of bicyclists; Promote safety regarding sharing the road,

wearing helmets and following the rules of the road; Establish bicycling as

a recognized form of transportation, as well as recreation; Facilitate the

use of state and federal funds to meet our goals; and Disseminate

information about constituents' major events in the state.




Accomplishments: Wrote and passed legislation that repealed the mandatory

sidepath law and defeated its reinstatement in 1998; Defeated a bill that

would have required all bicyclists to ride on the left side of the road,

facing traffic; Defeated legislation that would have required bicyclists to

ride single file; Worked with the MoDOT to change its policy on shoulder

rumble strips to allow bicyclists some smooth shoulder; and Worked with

Amtrak in 1997 to allow unboxed bicycles to be rolled aboard.




Membership Application (send the following information to MBF): Name,

Address, City, State, Zip, Home #, Work #, Email address, Name of

organization, Organization website, email and address.




Minimum donations for dues: $15 for individual membership; $30 for club

affiliation; $50 for business membership.




Membership Benefits: Framework to provide a united voice on issues of

interest to bicyclists in the state; Quarterly newsletter, email newsletter

and/or legislative updates; Liason with MoDOT and the Legislature; Motorist

Contact Program (upon contacting MBF to report the license tag number of a

unsafe motorist, a letter including the law regarding bikes will be sent

to the motorist); and Provision of names of contact people on various

issues.




Read more

Article

Ken Kifer's Bike Pages - bicycle advocacy, practical bicycle, camping, and commuting tips, safety tips
Read more

Article

Read more

14-year Old Bicyclist Killed in Independence

Three young people in Independence were struck by vehicles last week while bicycling or walking on city streets. One of them, 14-year-old Daniel R. Eiermann of Independence, was killed near 23rd Street and Arlington Avenue about 8:00PM, while riding his bike.

Read the KCStar story here.
Read more

KC Area CMAQ Projects Under Review Late October 2002

The Mid-America Regional Council has quite a lot of money to spend on CMAQ (Congestion Management/Air Quality) projects. Mostly these involve bicycle and pedestrian projects. Projects proposed include sidewalks, sidepaths (one-sided wide sidewalks for both bikes & peds), multi-use paths along riverfronts/streams, Phase IV of BikeKC (on-street bicycle routes), and a few miscellaneous projects.

With such a large amount of money involved, MARC receives astonishingly few public comments. I (Brent Hugh) wrote some lengthy comments about the projects (specifically, criticizing "sidepath" projects and the scoring procedure for projects).

Here is more detail about the projects and issues from Dale Crawford:




Forward comments to CMAQ Committee Project Evaluation Workgroup, MARC, via MARC's web site would be quickest:

On the following link that also includes the project descriptions, send your comments to James Joerke and Aaron Bartlett.

http://www.marc.org/transportation/cmaq/overview.htm

Their email links are at the bottom of the page. State that you've read the projects and do not support wide sidewalks as viable bicycle transportation. Joerke is the CMAQ Workgroup Committee staff laison. Bartlett is the bike/ped coordinator and understands this concern, but needs to hear from the masses in able to be effective when contradicting recommendations from local governments. Emails should be addressed via MARC to the Conni Hadden, Chair, CMAQ Project Evaluation Workgroup. Hadden is a Liberty Council member and on MARC's CMAQ Committee, the Total Transportation Committee and is the only politician on the CMAQ Evaluation Workgroup. She is supportive of bike/ped, but needs to be effectively educated. As Chair she is directing the meetings, not making the recommendations so, as always with politicians, be respectful and to the point. Remember KCMO Councilman Ed Ford. Although he did not agree with us, we gained respect from him by our po sitive actions. We can have greater influence right now citywide on pavement be ready to be laid.

70% of a projects score come from two categories: Emissions reductions and cost effectiveness. The emissions reductions are based on the theory a percentage (usually +/-2%) of the average daily trips (ADT) for automobiles of an adjacent road would be reduced by providing a facility on a road, including wide sidewalks. There is not distinction as to the type of facility. Bike lanes have the same reduction value as wide sidewalks. The applicants claim wide sidewalks promote "non-traffic experienced" cyclists usage of the facility for utilitarian purposes. But AASHTO says there still the most dangerous.

Here are a few of the questions/points I raised at the evaluation meeting for bike/ped projects. Why would we put less experienced cyclists on more dangerous facilities? If wide sidewalks are not used by the "experienced" cyclists, what is the resulting emissions benefit after they are factored out of the percentage ADT reduction? How does this reduction affect the scoring? Why are AASHTO guidelines (safety) not a factor in the scoring CMAQ projects? Why are limited federal funds being used to build new sidewalks and new roads that should have had them built on them to begin with? Why should federal funds be used to pay for the entire sidewalk instead of just the additional width for the "bicycle" accommodation when most cities require sidewalks be built with all roadways?

Please personalize with your own experience/opinion as you see fit, just keep the comments brief. The next evaluation group meeting in Oct. 23. So do not delay forwarding comments. Please blind copy your emails to me so I can know what was sent to MARC. Avoid sending the same email to the bike list as responses from other list members will be responded to MARC as well. Copy your email into a separate email for the list, if you desire.

Dale Crawford

Read more

Safe Routes to Schools, TEA21 Re-Authorization, MO Rep. Sam Graves

I (Brent Hugh) recently wrote Sam Graves, Missouri Representative from the 6th District (which includes Liberty & St. Joseph) about supporting the inclusion of "Safe Routes to Schools" in the TEA21 re-authorization. You may know that this has been proposed recently and seems to have some substantial support.

Graves is a member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and so is very involved in the TEA-21 re-authorization question.

I received a reply from Graves just yesterday (dated September 25th, 2002). It included the following interesting tidbits:

"As you may know, Congress enacted the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century Act (TEA-2 1) in 1998. A federal funding formula known as the Revenue Aligned Budget Authority (RABA) mechanism guaranteed minimum levels of funding for infrastructure projects. The RABA mechanism determines how much of the collected gas tax in the Highway Trust Fund would be returned to the states. Essentially, RABA was calculated using previously collected gas taxes and projected gas tax revenue. While the mechanism returned record amounts to the states at the height of the economic boom, an economic slowdown has returned the actual funding to lower numbers. These lower numbers limit which programs receive federal funding.

"As a member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, I look forward to working on the reauthorization of TEA-21 in 2003. First, I will support stable funding levels for our infrastructure and will fight to ensure that the Highway Trust Fund is used solely for transportation projects, as it was intended. I also will give attention to trail programs that will ensure the safety of pedestrians."


My comments:

1. This explains why federal funds have become harder to get recently.

2. It sounds as though Graves would oppose things like recreational bicycle trails funded by TEA21's successor. He may have other things in mind when he says "ensure that the Highway Trust Fund is used solely for transportation projects", but I'll bet (although he doesn't say so explicitly) that the multi-use trail funding is high on his list of non-transportation projects.

3. This could be an opportunity for bicyclists to push for a higher proportion of Highway Trust Funds to be used for on-road bicycle plans and on-road improvements that help bicycling. Under TEA21 the proportion has been something like 70% or 80% of the bicycling-related money towards multi-use trails (which, let's face it, mostly tend to be recreational in nature) and the rest for on-road projects. Personally, I would like to see the proportion changed and approximately reversed. I think more money put into making streets more bicycle-friendly would get more people riding, for the simple reason that streets already go close to where most people live and trails never will.

The rationales for changing the funding proportions to favor on-road projects would be:

a. On road bicycle projects serve a transportational purpose (thus diffusing the arguments of those like Graves who argue that gas tax funds should be used solely for transportation). Bicycling is already a more popular transportation choice than mass transit, so it is a real, legitimate transportation alternative and deserves funding at least on par with mass transit funding.

b. More bicycling helps reduce congestion (another transportational purpose).

c. On major roads, almost all bicycle-related improvements are also improvements from the motorist's perspective: wider, smoother, cleaner roads with good shoulders, greater separation between autos and pedestrians (because there is a bicycle lane, shoulder, or wide curb lane giving more space between sidewalk and motor vehicle travel lane), and so on.

[By the way, please don't cast me as a "trail-hater", because I'm not. We can have that discussion another day, but in short my position is: Both have their place; the proportion between them in a transportation funding package should be different than it has been.]

4. To make "Safe Routes to Schools" really helpful for bicyclists will require it to be written carefully with input from bicycle advocacy organizations--"the devil is in the details". But, in general, and hoping that the details turn out right, I think bicyclists should support the "Safe Routes to Schools" proposal in the TEA21 re-authorization, for these reasons.

a. "Safe Routes to Schools" helps cast bicycle-related improvements in terms of a clear and very popular transportation purpose: getting kids safely to and from school. This helps both in terms of helping make bicycling a viable transportation choice in the U.S. and in getting a powerful coalition of parents, teachers, and schools on "our side".

b. Routes from home to school, in every city and town throughout the entire country, encompasses a tremendous number of streets and roads. Imagine all those roads as being made bicycle-friendly! As is the case with current TEA21 projects, nothing will force communities to participate in the Safe Routes to Schools project. But this federal funding will give communities a powerful funding incentive to join the Safe Routes to Schools program and make streets and roads throughout their communities more bicycle- (and pedestrian-) friendly.

c. Bicycle advocates have long noted the decline in child and teen bicycling in the U.S. Safe Routes to Schools could be a powerful way to get more kids (and their parents) out there walking and biking. This can only be good for the future of bicycling.

--Brent Hugh

Read more

Roads were built for bicycles

By Caryn Giarratano, October 2000, Jefferson City News Tribune: Bicycle racing is the second most popular spectator sport in the world, behind only soccer. The bicycle remains a significant transportation tool. There are 800 million bicycles in worldwide use compared to 400 million motorized vehicles. The majority of these bicycles are used for transportation. In some cities in western Europe, 25 percent to 50 percent of all trips are by bicycle. There are even cities in the U.S. in which 10 percent to 25 percentt of all trips are by bicycle.
Read more

Wheels and Heels - October 2002

Email news from MoDOT Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator Caryn Giarratano

Greetings Windbenders!

The first week of September, I spent in St. Paul, MN, at the
ProBike/ProWalk conference to learn more about bike/ped access, issues,
facilities and ADA guidelines. I left Minnesota with my self-confidence
renewed, my focus broadened and my resolve to make my state a better place
to walk and ride bolstered.

It has become apparent that some of the MoDOT policies are vague and need
to be rewritten. I am working with MoDOT staff to rewrite the grate policy
in the Standard Plans and the Project Development Manual to allow only
bike-safe curved-vane grates on roadways and shoulders. It's looking good
for bike-friendly changes in six months!

The MoDOT rumblestrip policy needs to be rewritten also. I am collecting
other states' policies and working with a research team at UMR towards this
pursuit. What I think would work best is a narrow rumblestrip outside or on
the edge line to provide a barrier between the motorists and bicyclists.
This would allow smooth, wind-swept pavement two feet to the right of the
edgeline for experienced cyclists, and the rest of the shoulder towards the
ditch for those not comfortable riding close to traffic.

Our Share the Road policy needs attention and is waiting for me to have
time to address it. I have begun the process of identifying six bicycle
transportation corridors in our state. We already have three national
routes identified by Adventure Cyclists: Mississippi River Trail (along the
eastern edge of the state that connects Minnesota with Louisiana),
TransAmerica Trail (along the southern part of the state that connects the
west coast to the east coast) and the Lewis and Clark Trail that follows
the Missouri River from St. Louis to Oregon. I would like to identify three
more corridors to form three east-west and three north-south routes upon
which we may build to create an efficient infrastructure.

My first task in the area of safety is to sort the many flyers I have
collected. I plan to work with other state agencies to create a bike-safety
packet and a pedestrian-safety packet. Speaking of pedestrian safety, I am
working with the Department of Health to help expand the Safe Routes to
School program.

Bridge access is a burning issue for bicyclists. I have been granted
permission and given the funding to make the northbound bridge over the
Missouri River at Jefferson City bike-accessible by restriping the lanes to
provide a seven-foot wide outside shoulder and by replacing the grates with
bike-safe ones. My next pursuit is to gain bike/ped access on the
southbound bridge to allow those who ride over the bridge to ride back!

Last month, I began receiving requests from bicycle clubs, city government
groups and civic organizations to speak to their groups regarding bicycle
and pedestrian issues. I have been traveling all over the state! I love the
idea of creating a communications network, so we may reach consensus of
what we want, and then go for it!

It would be my recommendation for all bicyclists in the state to attend the
Missouri Bicycle Federation annual business meeting and election of
officers Sunday, November 11, from 1-4 pm in the Viewpoint Conference Room
at the Capital Region Medical Center in Jefferson City. I have been lining
up some high-powered speakers to discuss bicycle facilities, share the road
policy, national bike routes that cross Missouri, a Missouri Bike Map,
rumblestrips, grates, funding and bridge access.

My plan is to create a communications network in Missouri to advance
bicycle and pedestrian safe access. Please help to make Missouri a better
place to walk and ride!

Please forward this newsletter to anyone you feel may be interested. If you
are not on the mailing list and would like to be added, please email me
your wish.

Tailwinds, Caryn

Caryn Giarratano, PhD
MoDOT Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator
573-522-9297
giarrc1@mail.modot.state.mo.us
Read more

Recent Advocacy Alerts

Missouri senator and congressman poised to influence federal bicycle and pedestrian funding . . . a crucial meeting about Kansas City mountain bike trail access in city parks . . . St. Louis County petitioned to become more bicycle friendly . . . read about these stories and more on the Missouri Advocacy Alerts Page.
Read more

It is time for Missouri bicyclists to unite!!!

Important MBF organizational meeting Sunday, November 3rd, 2002, Jefferson City. Bike ride in the morning, presentations in the afternoon. Caryn Giarratano has really outdone herself lining up a stellar cast of bicycling experts. Don't miss it! Click here for details.
Read more